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How to build an Adirondack Chair

Your project photos

From Bob P.
Greetings, Buildeazy Team... more below

To see the free plans for this project click here.
For the $5 downloadable version, free of ads click here.

Adirondack chair made by Bob photo 1
Adirondack chair made by Bob photo 2

From Bob P.
Greetings, Buildeazy Team.
I bought the plans for the Adirondack Chair a few weeks ago. Siwsan said she wanted a pair, so what could an obedient and well trained husband do but say, 'Yes, dear'?
A fairly easy build, the first one took a few days, the second,less than a day.
Now to make a pair for my brother and wife, in Rtorua?. Such is life, but they are very dear to me, these two.
Problems during the build, nothing major, really, the photos (Included) will show a slight change in the front of the arms on one of the chairs. A semicircular front will become the standard from now on.
Also, for short people, the front leg will be reduced by 50mm not, as one might suspect, from the bottom of the leg, but the top. This to keep the ground to seat height correct.
For the next two, I shall cut the angle where the top back support attaches to the rear of the arms, first, before I cut the taper to the arm itself. Much easier to do it this way, and increases safety when cutting, as it means the Compound mitre saw will always be cutting to my right, and controlled by my stronger arm.
The top and bottom back support rails will be installed dry, uncut and then scribed as to the cuts needed to provide full support for the four back rest upright boards. Then, of course, glued and screwed into their permanent position. The off cut from these will be an infill piece to close the gap between the last seat rail and the front of the back boards.
The tops seat rails were rounded on the edges, somewhat roughly, and smoothed to provide an even contour at the contact areas for the users legs.
Because these chairs will always be outside, and enjoying New Zealand?s stronger sunlight, with the hole in the ozone layer, and tempered by a high rainfall in our specific area, all joints are glued with a foaming gap filling polyurethane adhesive and screwed with stainless steel screws. Attaching the front legs to the seat sides is the only joint not glued, but held with two galvanised coach bolts.
All in all, a well thought out design. I will take progress photos of the next two, describing each process and why.

To see the free plans for this project click here.
For the $5 downloadable version, free of ads click here.

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