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How to build a kids' 2 in 1 bench & picnic table

The wood sizes

wood stock size

This project is written in both Metric (mm) and Imperial (inches).
The metric measurements are given first followed by the standard measurements in brackets ( ).
For example: 45 mm x 19 mm (¾" x 1¾").

For the framework of this project I used 45 mm x 19 mm (¾" x 1¾") stock.
That width is not an overly common size and if you are unable to source it or obtain it by other means such as ripping it out of wider stock, you can use 38 mm x 19 mm (¾" x 1½") stock in place of.
The latter is a more common size. However, if you use it changes will need to be made to the length of a couple of frame members. More about that below.

Using wood with a different width

The stock size and associated measurements (lengths, hole placements) are important to the workings of this folding unit.

If you use 38 mm x 19 mm (¾" x 1½") stock in place of the 45 mm x 19 mm (¾" x 1¾") stock used here, make the following changes:

1.) Make the diameter of the template (referred to in Step 1) 38 mm (1½").

2.) Cut pieces [b] & [c] (the rear legs) 9 mm (⅜") shorter than stated in the plan drawings.

3.) Pieces [d2] (the leg stops) will need to be a little bit longer but it's easy enough to check the measurements when you are up to that step.

Using wood with a different thickness

Changing the stock thickness (of that used in this project) will impact on the length of the bolts and also the difference between the lengths of the seat boards and the length of the tabletop in relation to one another.

The bolts (there are only four) will need to be long enough to go through two (frame piece) thicknesses.

The difference in length between the shorter (rear) and longer (front) seat boards is the sum of the thickness of four framing pieces.
For example, if the framing pieces are 19 mm (¾") thick, four times that is 76 mm (3"). Therefore 76 mm (3") will be the difference between the length of the front (longer) and rear (shorter) seats boards.

Likewise, the difference in length between the tabletop and the longer (front) seat board is the sum of the thickness of four framing pieces.
For example, if the framing pieces are 19 mm (¾") thick, four times that is 76 mm (3"). Therefore 76 mm (3") will be the difference between the length of the front (longer) seat board and the length of the tabletop.

Making the table longer or shorter

Apply the same rule as above regarding the length of the seat boards and the length of the tabletop in relation to one another. By applying that rule you can make the unit as long or as short as you want - within practical reason of course.

Note: You can purchase this plan in downloadable PDF file, print friendly and in clean copy (free of ads) for only $5.00.   Click here to purchase.
The plans can be purchased online and immediately downloaded to your computer.

To view all available $5 downloadable plans click here

The task ahead simply involves...

The task ahead simply involves cutting the pieces to length, cutting the angles and rounds on the pieces that need it (strictly adhering to the dimensions given in the plans), drilling through the pieces that need it, assembling the frames, and then last but not least - adding the seats, tabletop, and a bit of bracing.

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