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How to build an 8x7 Tudor-Style Shed

Section 21: Working with angles

working with angles

Section 21.1. Working with angles

Sometime throughout this project you will have to make some angle cuts across certain members.
Somewhere you will come across a sentence similar to...

"... cut one end of the wood 10° off square."     What's that?

an angle cut accross a piece of wood

Ok. Firstly, what's a square cut?

A square cut is a cut that runs straight across a piece of wood.

Therefore, a cut that runs at 10° to the square cut, is a cut that is 10° off square.

All right! So how do we get the angles?

There are four different angles you will work with throughout this project.
They are a 10° angle, a 26.87° angle, a 36.87° angle and a 53.13° angle.

caculating an angle using rise over run

Eh! They sound like awkward angles to try and work out.

Not really, if you were talking slope (rise over run)
10° would be a rise of 1 for every 5.67 of run.
26.87° would be a rise of 1 for every 2 of run (or near enough).
36.87° would be a rise of 3 for every 4 of run.
53.13°. would be a rise of 4 in every 3 of run.
So, using the above 'rise over run' equation you can make an angle template by marking the required angles on a rectangle panel.

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Getting the angles

getting the angles

Make an angle template by marking the required angles on a rectangle panel, say a piece of plywood 18" x 24" (450mm x 600mm).

To get a 10° angle, measure 1 unit across the rectangle panel and 5.67 units down.
A unit can be any measurement. For example: if you make each unit 4 inches (100mm), then measure 4 inches or 100mm (1 unit) across and 22 11/16 inches or 567mm (5.67 units) down to make a 10° angle.

To get a 26.87° angle, measure 1 unit across and 2 units down.
Once again a unit can be anything. If your make each unit four inches (100mm), it would be 4 inches or 100mm (1 unit) across and 8 inches or 200mm (2 units) down to make a 26.87° angle.

To get a 36.87° angle, measure 3 unit across and 4 units down.
Once again a unit can be anything. If your make each unit four inches (100mm), it would be 12 inches or 300mm (3 unit) across and 16 inches or 400mm (4 units) down to make a 36.87° angle.

To get a 53.13° angle, measure 4 unit across and 3 units down.

Note: Once again a unit can be anything. If your make each unit four inches (100mm), it would be 16 inches or 400mm (4 unit) across and 12 inches or 300mm (3 units) down to make a 53.13° angle.

You have now made a template for a 10° angle, a 26.87° angle, a 36.87° angle and a 53.13° angle.
Set the T-bevel gauge to the required angle and transfer it to any piece that requires that particular angle cut.

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